Algorithms

 

PROGRAMMING, ALGORITHMIC TRADING, APPS, ROBOTICS, GAME DEVELOPMENT, MACHINE LERANING , DATA SCIENCE OTHER TECHNOLOGICAL

CONTESTS, HACKATONS, CHALLENGES AND COMPETITIONS

Competitive programming - Wikipedia


Maratón Nacional de Programación

ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest (abbreviated as ACM-ICPC or just ICPC) is an annual multi-tiered competitive programming competition among the universities of the world. The contest is sponsored by IBM. Headquartered at Baylor University, with autonomous regions on six continents,

Stanford CS 97SI: Introduction to Competitive Programming Contests http://cs97si.stanford.edu


TopCoder is a company which administers contests in computer programming. TopCoder hosts fortnightly online competitive programming competitions—known as SRMs or "single round matches"—as well as weekly competitions in design and development. The work in design and development produces useful software which is licensed for profit by TopCoder. Competitors involved in the creation of these components are paid royalties based on these sales. The software resulting from algorithm competitions—and the less-frequent marathon matches—is not usually directly useful, but sponsor companies sometimes provide money to pay the victors. Statistics (including an overall "rating" for each developer) are tracked over time for competitors in each category.

CodeChef is a non-profit educational initiative of Directi. It is a global competitive programming platform which supports over 50 programming languages and has a large community of programmers that helps students and professionals test and improve their coding skills. Its objective is to provide a platform for practice, competition and improvement for both students and professional software developers] Apart from this, it aims to reach out to students while they are young and inculcate a culture of programming in India. (Wikipedia)

ICPF

ICFP Programming Contest

The ICFP Programming Contest is an international programming competition held annually around June or July since 1998, with results announced at the International Conference on Functional Programming. Teams may be of any size and any programming language(s) may be used. There is also no entry fee. Participants have 72 hours to complete and submit their entry over the Internet. There is often also a 24-hour lightning division.The winners reserve "bragging rights" to claim that their language is "the programming tool of choice for discriminating hackers". As such, one of the competition's goals is to showcase the capabilities of the contestants' favourite programming languages and tools. Previous first prize winners have used Haskell, OCaml, C++, Cilk, Java and F#.

Battlecode (6.370) is MIT's longest running hardcore programming competition, featuring a unique challenge that combines battle strategy, software engineering and artificial intelligence. Both beginner and advanced coders are welcome.

 

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